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Chicken with Red Curry and Saffron

Chicken with Red Curry and Saffron

One of my new favorite combinations is saffron and curry. I first came across it in the cookbook,
50 Great Curries of India by Camellia Panjabi (I believe it was a shrimp curry), but then, a couple of weeks ago I found this keeper online – Chicken with Red Curry and Saffron.

One of my favorite parts of this dish (in addition to the ease it comes together with), is the nut, rice, and curry leaf garnish. In Portland, sometimes you can find curry leaves at New Seasons, but I’ve had a lot luck lately with getting them at the market attached to the new Bollywood Theater on SE Division. If you can’t find curry leaves by you, this dish will still be great without them – but try to find some.

So, before it gets all spring-like, take advantage of the chill in the air and make a bowl of this comforting meal. Leftovers will, of course, make a great lunch.

Chicken with Red Curry and Saffron

Chicken with Red Curry and Saffron

Chicken with Red Curry and Saffron

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Salted Peanut Butter and Orange Marmalade Bars

Salted Peanut Butter and Orange Marmalade Bars

I don’t really remember eating an abundance of peanut butter and jelly sandwiches when I was a kid, but I must have because it is one of my most favorite long-standing food partnerships. Like ham and swiss. Garlic and (insert name of any food). Pizza and beer. You get the idea.

This recipe is like the best peanut butter and jelly sandwich ever. I really like orange marmalade and think it’s underrated as a peanut butter pal, but if you don’t care for it, you can really use any flavor jam or jelly. It may be a bit sweeter, but still delicious.

And if you don’t want to risk eating the entire pan of these all by yourself, they freeze well. Just wrap separately, then pop one or two out and let them defrost on the counter for 30-60 minutes. Of course they will also work well for a sweet Superbowl snack for a crowd!

Salted Peanut Butter and Orange Marmalade Bars

Salted Peanut Butter and Orange Marmalade Bars

Salted Peanut Butter and Orange Marmalade Bars

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FFwD: Compote de Pommes Two Ways and Apple Compote Buckwheat Muffins with Hazelnuts, Raisins, and Molasses

FFwD: Compote de Pommes Two Ways and Apple Compote Buckwheat Muffins with Hazelnuts, Raisins, and Molasses

This week’s French Fridays with Dorie is Apple Compote Two Ways or as the French would say half of it, Compote de Pommes Two Ways. I made mine the second way — basically I kept cooking it until it was super think. Then added some butter. I was expecting something like dark apple butter, but it was really just more like thick applesauce. And unfortunately, I’m not a huge fan of applesauce. So, I decided to use it to make muffins, which is something I typically do when I have applesauce around.

Notes: I did make a half recipe, so I used three apples. Empire apples to be specific. And, also because I knocked this one and next week’s Chestnut and Pear Soup out at the same time, I had a little extra rosemary and put a small sprig in with the apples for the initial cooking time. The half recipe gave me a bit more than a half cup of apple compote.

Here’s a link to everyone’s apple compote posts and my photos (and the muffin recipe) below.

. . . → Read More: FFwD: Compote de Pommes Two Ways and Apple Compote Buckwheat Muffins with Hazelnuts, Raisins, and Molasses

Almond Gazpacho (Ajo Blanco) with Mango & Crispy Prosciutto

Almond Gazpacho (Ajo Blanco)

Wow, I can’t ever remember a summer in Portland being so humid. Because of that (and also just because I love — LOVE– fall), I seriously can’t wait for the weather to get colder. Until then, there’s gazpacho. Yes, it’s usually made with tomatoes, cucumber, and peppers, and while that version is completely delicious, there’s something to be aid about the version with bread, almonds, and garlic. And that something is, Mmmmm.

You can use plain old white bread, but if you live by a Trader Joe’s you may want to get a loaf of the round, small rosemary bread and use that. Or just add some rosemary leaves while blending. While not exactly traditional, the flavor of that herb is really good in this gazpacho.

Green grapes are the typical garnish, but I found diced mango or grilled fig halves to be just as tasty. Also, some crumbled, crisp prosciutto, using this recipe.

The gazpacho recipe is from one of my most favorite cookbooks of all time — The New Spanish Table by Anya von Bremzen. If you don’t have it, I highly recommend it. I have made so many amazing recipes from . . . → Read More: Almond Gazpacho (Ajo Blanco) with Mango & Crispy Prosciutto

(Almost Healthy) Banana Muffins with Almond-Coconut Streusel

Banana Muffins with Almond-Coconut Streusel

This is one of (if not THE) best muffin recipes I have ever made. It’s based on a recipe in Bouchon Bakery Cookbook by Thomas Keller and Sebastien Rouxel, which has become my go-to baking reference. That said, I think I know why this recipe is so delicious – lots of butter.

Normally, when I make muffins, I substitute apple sauce for the oil or butter and maybe halve the sugar. Um, no. Not this time! And still, even after telling myself, “Okay, just try making it with all the butter…,” with a stick and a half of butter, I just couldn’t quite do it. But, I did use a total of six and a half tablespoons (more than halved from the original recipe). I substituted olive oil for some of the butter (even in the struesel) which worked just fine.

The giving-egg-amounts-in-weight thing: Look, I love Thomas Keller, a dinner at The French Laundry is a dream, etc, etc…, but seriously, I am not going to weigh eggs. I know that in a professionally bakery you probably would, or if you’re Thomas Keller you would, but I would not and do . . . → Read More: (Almost Healthy) Banana Muffins with Almond-Coconut Streusel