About this Blog

Portland, Oregon food blog with over seven years worth of recipes, restaurant features and food photos.

Categories

Awesome Onion Goggles

Lemon Curd Thumbprint Coconut Macaroons

Lemon Curd Thumbprint Coconut Macaroons

Sometimes, you find yourself with a bag of sweetened, shredded coconut burning a whole in your cabinet and you just need to do something with it — hello, coconut macaroons! This recipe was based on an idea that I saw in Food Network magazine, but I messed around with the original recipe a lot. I decreased the egg white (for a crunchier macaroon) and whisked that in a mixer, decreased the sugar, and added the lemon curd and poppy seeds.

The recipe below will make 8-10 macaroons. The problem I always have with these types of cookies is that they are best the first day, but then the recipe makes so many that you can never eat them all the first day. Solution – half batch! And if you’re making them for a crowd, just use the full 14. oz bag of coconut and double the rest of the ingredients for 16 -20 macaroons. Perfect for an Easter treat!

You could also swap out the vanilla for lemon extract, but I actually think the hint of vanilla with the tart lemon is very nice.

Lemon Curd Thumbprint Coconut <span style= . . . → Read More: Lemon Curd Thumbprint Coconut Macaroons

Salted Peanut Butter and Orange Marmalade Bars

Salted Peanut Butter and Orange Marmalade Bars

I don’t really remember eating an abundance of peanut butter and jelly sandwiches when I was a kid, but I must have because it is one of my most favorite long-standing food partnerships. Like ham and swiss. Garlic and (insert name of any food). Pizza and beer. You get the idea.

This recipe is like the best peanut butter and jelly sandwich ever. I really like orange marmalade and think it’s underrated as a peanut butter pal, but if you don’t care for it, you can really use any flavor jam or jelly. It may be a bit sweeter, but still delicious.

And if you don’t want to risk eating the entire pan of these all by yourself, they freeze well. Just wrap separately, then pop one or two out and let them defrost on the counter for 30-60 minutes. Of course they will also work well for a sweet Superbowl snack for a crowd!

Salted Peanut Butter and Orange Marmalade Bars

Salted Peanut Butter and Orange Marmalade Bars

Salted Peanut Butter and Orange Marmalade Bars

. . . → Read More: Salted Peanut Butter and Orange Marmalade Bars

Blood Orange and Cardamom Sherbet

Blood Orange and Cardamom Sherbet

I tend to neglect my ice cream maker with a fair amount of frequency. It’s stored out in the garage freezer, so it’s not like I see it all the time to help remind me. Plus, it seems like some of my previous ice cream/sorbet experiments have not blown me away.

Enter this Blood Orange and Cardamom Sherbet…Blown away!

So creamy, pretty much ice crystal free, and a not too sweet, but with a totally dessert-like flavor. And such a pretty pink color. It reminds me slightly of my beloved, gone-but-not-forgotten Grapefruit Sorbetto at Cafe Pallino. I think I am going to try sherbets more often (mostly fruit juice, but also with cream), or at least make more custard-less style ice creams. I seem to have more luck with those types — in terms of texture. Luckily, all of my ice cream maker experiments have tasted delicious.

For this, I used Penzey’s cardamom seeds but Savory Spice Shop also carries them. You could just as easily use 4-5 cardamom pods, smashed, to steep with the cream. Or, if you have neither, skip it all together and go for more of a Blood Orange Creamsicle . . . → Read More: Blood Orange and Cardamom Sherbet

FFwD: Compote de Pommes Two Ways and Apple Compote Buckwheat Muffins with Hazelnuts, Raisins, and Molasses

FFwD: Compote de Pommes Two Ways and Apple Compote Buckwheat Muffins with Hazelnuts, Raisins, and Molasses

This week’s French Fridays with Dorie is Apple Compote Two Ways or as the French would say half of it, Compote de Pommes Two Ways. I made mine the second way — basically I kept cooking it until it was super think. Then added some butter. I was expecting something like dark apple butter, but it was really just more like thick applesauce. And unfortunately, I’m not a huge fan of applesauce. So, I decided to use it to make muffins, which is something I typically do when I have applesauce around.

Notes: I did make a half recipe, so I used three apples. Empire apples to be specific. And, also because I knocked this one and next week’s Chestnut and Pear Soup out at the same time, I had a little extra rosemary and put a small sprig in with the apples for the initial cooking time. The half recipe gave me a bit more than a half cup of apple compote.

Here’s a link to everyone’s apple compote posts and my photos (and the muffin recipe) below.

. . . → Read More: FFwD: Compote de Pommes Two Ways and Apple Compote Buckwheat Muffins with Hazelnuts, Raisins, and Molasses

FFwD: Rice Pudding with Caramel Apples

French Fridays with Dorie: Rice Pudding with Caramel Apples

This week’s French Fridays with Dorie is a very Fall recipe – Rice Pudding with Caramel Apples. Like so many of the French Fridays recipes, I made a half recipe here and that worked quite well for two fairly generous portions.

Here’s the thing though – while I loved the rice pudding (Oh! and I added 1/ tsp powdered ginger) and used my new IFBC vanilla, I was not super-super in love with the caramel apples. My caramel sauce actually seemed perfect until I added the apple cider. Then, it looked way too liquid-y. And yeah, I remembered to halve that part. So, I’m not quite sure what my problem was or what I did. It still tasted good, though.

I will probably make this pudding again (and jwa really liked it). Although, I think next time, I’ll just start cooking the arborio rice right in the milk — especially since I used 2%. It seems like it might have benefited from a little extra starchy creaminess if there’s a bit less fat.

Here’s a link to Dorie’s recipe at Epicurious. Give it a try and see what you think! . . . → Read More: FFwD: Rice Pudding with Caramel Apples