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Portland, Oregon food blog with over seven years worth of recipes, restaurant features and food photos.

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Harissa-Stewed Butternut Squash

Harissa-Stewed Butternut Squash

For Christmas, I received the Toro Bravo cookbook and although there are many pages ear-marked, this is the first recipe I’ve made from it. And I have to say, although I deviated a bit from the recipe (and took some shortcuts), this was delicious!

I did add some yellow bell pepper and (full disclosure) I used a bag of cubed Trader Joe’s butternut squash (because I had some and I needed to use it). I can only imagine how awesome this would be with freshly cubed squash. If you use a big squash and you have more than 12 oz cubed, just use extra cream and harissa, or straight-up double the rest of the ingredients.

This is great on the side of some grilled fish or chicken. Or just add a huge salad and make it a vegetarian meal. Also, definitely get the book for the original recipe — it will be even better! (Spoiler: there’s butter involved).

* Ingredient note: The original recipe calls for Rose Petal Harissa, which you can find at PastaWorks if you live in Portland. I used the Harissa paste in the yellow tube. That worked great, although, it is a bit . . . → Read More: Harissa-Stewed Butternut Squash

Chicken with Red Curry and Saffron

Chicken with Red Curry and Saffron

One of my new favorite combinations is saffron and curry. I first came across it in the cookbook,
50 Great Curries of India by Camellia Panjabi (I believe it was a shrimp curry), but then, a couple of weeks ago I found this keeper online – Chicken with Red Curry and Saffron.

One of my favorite parts of this dish (in addition to the ease it comes together with), is the nut, rice, and curry leaf garnish. In Portland, sometimes you can find curry leaves at New Seasons, but I’ve had a lot luck lately with getting them at the market attached to the new Bollywood Theater on SE Division. If you can’t find curry leaves by you, this dish will still be great without them – but try to find some.

So, before it gets all spring-like, take advantage of the chill in the air and make a bowl of this comforting meal. Leftovers will, of course, make a great lunch.

Chicken with Red Curry and Saffron

Chicken with Red Curry and Saffron

Chicken with Red Curry and Saffron

. . . → Read More: Chicken with Red Curry and Saffron

FFwD: Boeuf à la Ficelle

FFwD: Boeuf à la Ficelle

I really tried to like this week’s French Fridays with Dorie recipe for Boeuf à la Ficelle. I did! But, no, and I wasn’t the only one that didn’t quite care for it. To begin with, neither of us are big meat-and-potatoes eaters. And my general feeling is that if I’m going to make steak, I want to make it count. Poaching a piece of beef tenderloin (I only used a half of a pound because there were only two if us and I had an inkling of how this was going to go), does not in any way, shape, or form count. This one was kind of doomed in our house from the start, I suppose.

That said, this is really only one of a handful of recipes from this cookbook that I haven’t enjoyed – so, that’s a pretty good track record for Around my French Table, actually.

Also, we have been in the middle of an out-of-the-ordinary SNOWPOCAPLYSE! here in Portland, so I couldn’t get all over town to find oxtail (although – marrow bones were no problem), so I made due with a packaged beef broth that I then added . . . → Read More: FFwD: Boeuf à la Ficelle

Winter Comfort Food: Roasted Chicken Thighs with Potatoes and Brussels Sprouts

Roasted Chicken Thighs with Brussels Sprouts and Potatoes

Just the other day, we got teased with about 10 minutes worth of snow. It didn’t stick or anything, but during a winter that so far has been extremely mild*, it was a nice 10 minutes. The kind of 10 minutes that make you want to go roast a chicken. And if you don’t want to roast a whole chicken, then at least maybe some chicken thighs.

A very nice aspect to this recipe (no matter what season you choose to make it) is that it is fairly one-dish. Especially if you marinate in a freezer bag. The honey in the marinade should give you a nice, darkened crust to your chicken.

And, like I mention below, the brussels and potatoes aren’t going to get that dark – if you want more color, just pop them under the broiler while the chicken rests.

Roasted Chicken Thighs with Brussels Sprouts and Potatoes

Roasted Chicken Thighs with Brussels Sprouts and Potatoes

Roasted Chicken Thighs with Brussels Sprouts and Potatoes

Roasted Chicken Thighs with Brussels Sprouts and Potatoes

. . . → Read More: Winter Comfort Food: Roasted Chicken Thighs with Potatoes and Brussels Sprouts

FFwD: Dressy Whole Wheat Pasta-Kale “Risotto”

FFwD: Dressy Whole Wheat Pasta Kale Risotto

Everyone seems to have loved this week’s French Fridays with Dorie recipe and I was no exception. Although, as someone who kind of feels like they over-indulged a bit during the holidays, I was not super enthusiastic about making a pasta dish filled with cream, cheese, and well…pasta. So, I changed it a bit.

The easiest swap was wheat pasta for the regular (a substitution that I make a lot), the second was skipping the cream – and not just because I was too lazy to go to the store. There’s already marscapone cheese in there, so I thought that, along with the Parmesan would be enough to make it creamy. Not to mention that this pasta dish is cooked kind of like a risotto (hence the name) and the liquid is not drained, so the starchy pasta broth would help it all bind together as well.

I also added some chopped kale and a bit more cheese (hey! because I skipped the cream!) and I think it turned out fairly well. It’s still extremely creamy, cheesy, and satisfying, if a little less French, I guess.

Here’s a link to everyone’s Dressy Pasta Risotto . . . → Read More: FFwD: Dressy Whole Wheat Pasta-Kale “Risotto”