About this Blog

Portland, Oregon food blog with many years worth of recipes, restaurant features, and food photos.

Categories

Awesome Onion Goggles

Christmas Cookies: Double Chocolate Peppermint Cookies

Christmas Cookies: Double Chocolate Peppermint Cookies

Generally, my cookie repertoire is fairly boring – chocolate chip, peanut bitter, an occasional oatmeal raisin. But sometimes, especially during the holidays, I like to mix it up a bit. These Double Chocolate Peppermint Cookies do just that and are quite festive as well! Of course, now I have a bunch of extra candy canes lying around the house, which will probably mean making some peppermint bark.

The original recipe called for the melted chocolate to be drizzled on top of the cooled cookies, but I think it makes much more sense to just spread a layer of chocolate on top – more surface area for the candy cane pieces to stick to. I also made mine about twice the size called for, (I used a small scoop that equals about two tablespoons), because bigger cookies are better cookies. Right?

Christmas Cookies: Double Chocolate Peppermint Cookies

Christmas Cookies: Double Chocolate Peppermint Cookies

Christmas Cookies: Double Chocolate Peppermint Cookies

Christmas Cookies: Double Chocolate Peppermint Cookies

Christmas Cookies: Double Chocolate Peppermint Cookies

Double Chocolate Peppermint Cookies
Adapted from . . . → Read More: Christmas Cookies: Double Chocolate Peppermint Cookies

FFwD: Orange-Almond Tuiles

Orange-Almond Tuiles

I wouldn’t call this a disaster, but it was maybe a mishap? I made a half recipe, and I think I scooped my dough a little on the large side, as I only got about about 12 tuiles. Which means, for this French Fridays with Dorie, I got ONE really perfect looking tuille. Oh, but it was really quite pretty! All the others had broken at one point, chipped, and even with two rebellious tuilles, reverted back to their somewhat flat shape.

I found that I needed to let mine sit on the hot cookie sheet for about two minutes, or trying to remove them, even with a metal spatula, was a mess of squished cookie unwilling to be put back together. Once on the rolling pin though, they seemed to set up (except for a couple that actually unfurled later on the plate). This one was a lot of work, and while good, I think I’ll just stick to some heartier chocolate chip cookies next time.

Oh yeah, and I obviously didn’t leave enough space between my dough balls when baking. They were easy enough to slice apart with the spatula, but it was . . . → Read More: FFwD: Orange-Almond Tuiles

Bacon Oatmeal Raisin Rosemary Cookies

Bacon Oatmeal Raisin Rosemary Cookies

You could certainly ask, “Why would you put bacon in a cookie?” And I would respond with, “Why not?”

I’m not a huge bacon-for-bacon’s-sake type of person but when I came across a recipe for Bacon Oatmeal Cookies, I was a bit intrigued. And on a recent cold, rainy day I decided to experiment a bit and try it out. Conclusion: while this certainly won’t replace a traditional, spiced, oatmeal raisin cookie, I think these are worthy of a batch or two – not quite a novelty, but not an instant, all-time favorite cookie (that’s chocolate chip, of course). But definitely bring them to a holiday party or a dinner for a unique snack.

I first saw this recipe on the Hot Cakes Bakery site – they sell the cookies but also linked to a recipe in Bon Appétit magazine, which I adapted below. Yes, I did cut down the bacon a bit, but I think it works well as a accent flavor, not a multiple-bacon-pieces-in-every-bite kind of thing. The resulting cookie was crisp, but with chewy raisins, a bit of smoke from the bacon, and a hint of rosemary flavor throughout.

Also, just . . . → Read More: Bacon Oatmeal Raisin Rosemary Cookies

FFwD: Pierre Herme’s Olive Sables

Pierre Herme’s Olive Sables

This week’s French Fridays with Dorie is a strange, little cookie. Grated egg yolk. Kalamata olives. Powdered sugar. Potato starch. So strange and yet so delightful — it’s Pierre Herme’s Olive Sables.

I really was a little skeptical about these and they are certainly not the type off cookie you necessarily want to dip in milk or anything, but we both really liked them. I think they’d work well paired with some cheese and fruit for a light dessert. They are a little salty and a little sweet.

Notes:
1. I actually already had potato starch that I had bought for a different recipe, so that was good.
2. I made a 1/3 of a recipe (used the rest of the hard boiled egg chopped up on a big dinner salad), because it did sound a little strange (and there are only two of us).
3. Lemon zest! I added a little to the dough. I was originally thinking orange zest (which I still think would be really great here), but I only had lemons.

Here’s a link to everyone’s French Fridays posts and my photos below.

Pierre Herme’s Olive Sables

Pierre <span style= . . . → Read More: FFwD: Pierre Herme’s Olive Sables

Holiday Cookies: Festive Fireplaces

Chocolate Fireplace Cookies

Over the weekend, I had a plan to make holiday cookies, the kind with frosting and everything. And at the end of the day (and a fairly cramped right hand later), I’m proud to say that I ended up with these cute little fireplace cookies.

They’re especially nice because you can make them as Christmas-y as you want or even adapt the decorations to whatever holiday you celebrate this time of year. You could also just make and eat them because it is winter and you are sitting in front of a warm, toasty fire (meta). They are very versatile cookies.

Chocolate Fireplace Cookies

I also made these using one of my new favorite ingredients — black cocoa powder.

Black Cocoa Cookies
Original recipe origin unknown
1 1/2 cups butter, softened (I have also used 1 cup shortening and 1/2 cup butter in this recipe and it works just as well)
2 1/2 cups sifted powdered sugar
2 large eggs
1 tsp vanilla extract
3 cups AP flour
1 /2 Dutch process cocoa
1/2 cup black cocoa powder
1/4 tsp salt
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon

Beat butter at medium speed with an electric mixer until creamy. Gradually add the powdered sugar, combining well. Add . . . → Read More: Holiday Cookies: Festive Fireplaces