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Late Spring Dessert: Strawberry Rhubarb Pie with a Lattice Crust

Strawberry Rhubarb Pie

Getting out of my changing-of-the-seasons slump with a strawberry rhubarb pie! So, delicious. The brown sugar, orange zest, and cinnamon all get together here (with the fresh fruit) to work a kind of pie magic. Every year, this is one of my most favorite pies to make! And not just because I like the challenge of a lattice crust (just kidding, it’s really easy)!

So yeah, take advantage of the remaining rhubarb season and make this pie now. Or, you could even decrease the sugar** just a little bit and try this with strawberries and peaches. Or strawberries and apricots. Or strawberries and strawberries.

Strawberry Rhubarb Pie

Strawberry Rhubarb Pie

Strawberry Rhubarb Pie

Strawberry Rhubarb Pie

Strawberry Rhubarb Pie

Strawberry Rhubarb Pie with a Lattice Crust
Adapted from a recipe in Bon Appétit magazine; 8 servings
1 recipe of your favorite pie dough (double crust), two discs chilled – mine is Dorie Greenspan’s Good for Almost Everything Pie Dough*
3 1/2 cups 1/2-inch-thick slices trimmed rhubarb (1 1/2 pounds untrimmed)
1 16-ounce container strawberries, halved (about 3 1/2 cups)
1/2 cup (packed) brown . . . → Read More: Late Spring Dessert: Strawberry Rhubarb Pie with a Lattice Crust

Lemon Curd Thumbprint Coconut Macaroons

Lemon Curd Thumbprint Coconut Macaroons

Sometimes, you find yourself with a bag of sweetened, shredded coconut burning a whole in your cabinet and you just need to do something with it — hello, coconut macaroons! This recipe was based on an idea that I saw in Food Network magazine, but I messed around with the original recipe a lot. I decreased the egg white (for a crunchier macaroon) and whisked that in a mixer, decreased the sugar, and added the lemon curd and poppy seeds.

The recipe below will make 8-10 macaroons. The problem I always have with these types of cookies is that they are best the first day, but then the recipe makes so many that you can never eat them all the first day. Solution – half batch! And if you’re making them for a crowd, just use the full 14. oz bag of coconut and double the rest of the ingredients for 16 -20 macaroons. Perfect for an Easter treat!

You could also swap out the vanilla for lemon extract, but I actually think the hint of vanilla with the tart lemon is very nice.

Lemon Curd Thumbprint Coconut <span style= . . . → Read More: Lemon Curd Thumbprint Coconut Macaroons

Food Blogger Cookbook Swap: Vanilla-Cardamom Madeleines & Tate’s Bake Shop Baking for Friends

Food Blogger Cookbook Swap: Tate's Bake Shop Baking for Friends

I was recently a participant in the Food Blogger Cookbook Swap, hosted by Alyssa of EverydayMaven and Faith of An Edible Mosiac. I sent a cookbook to a fellow food blogger and received a cookbook in return – Tate’s Bake Shop: Baking for Friends from Lisa at Flour me with Love. Thanks, Lisa!

I’m trying to actually do more baking, so this was a wonderful surprise. And it also just so happens that I recently bought a madeleine pan, so even though I was tempted by a number of recipes in this cookbook, I knew that the madeleine recipe was the one to try.

The original Vanilla Madeleine recipe from the cookbook makes 24 madeleines, which I wanted to half, so I could just make one pan of 12 cookies. But of course, there was the tricky 3-egg dilemma. How to half that easily — actually crack a second egg and use just half of that? Use one egg plus an egg white? Only use one egg and hope that one egg is un oeuf? (See what I did there)?

Then I remembered my most favorite cake in the whole . . . → Read More: Food Blogger Cookbook Swap: Vanilla-Cardamom Madeleines & Tate’s Bake Shop Baking for Friends

Valentine’s Day Baking: Heart-Glazed Cornmeal Almond Cookies

Heart-Glazed Cornmeal Almond Cookies

So here’s the thing about these cookies. I actually made them last year, fully intending to post them at that time and then this happened and I kind of lost interest in getting a Valentine’s Day post together. But this year, I decided that since I had liked the cookies and I had some nice photos, I would go ahead and post it. Early. And then I forgot.

So now, completely in character (procrastination, yay!), the day before valentine’s day is when I’m going to post about heart-centric cookies. But it’s okay. This cookie could really work for any holiday, even a non-holiday. First of all, the hearts don’t need to be pink or red. How about purple hearts? Black hearts? White hearts for an anniversary celebration.

And also, who says you have to use a heart shaped cookie cutter at all? The technique will work with any small cookie cutter – four leaf clovers, a fleur de lis, a pumpkin. Really, any not too complicated shape that you could easily fill in with glaze would be perfect.

When I made mine, I liked a cleaner look so I used a slightly smaller round cookie cutter . . . → Read More: Valentine’s Day Baking: Heart-Glazed Cornmeal Almond Cookies

FFwD: Paris-Brest

FfwD: Paris-Brest pastry

This week’s French Fridays with Dorie is Paris-Brest, which is a particular Parisan pastry that was created in the olden days (the 1890s) to commemorate the Paris–Brest bicycle race. It’s pâte à choux dough (like for cream puffs or gougères) piped out in circles, baked, sliced in half, and filled with an almond praline vanilla pastry cream. I opted to make a half recipe and instead of one big eight-inch pastry, I made four small ones.

Notes:
1. I think my pastry tip was on the small side, so I got more pastries than I was expecting.
2. I used English muffins rings to pipe my rings inside of, but I think I could have skipped this. Next time, I’ll try it without and see what happens.
3. I added coffee liqueur to my vanilla pastry cream.
4. Almost all of my sliced almonds fell off the tops of my pastries after baking.
5. I had enough pâte à choux leftover to make two cream puffs.
6. I decided to cover my puffs with melted chocolate and since my almonds mostly fell of the Paris-Brests, I covered two of those with chocolate too. The other two got the powdered sugar.

Check . . . → Read More: FFwD: Paris-Brest