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For Breakfast and for Snacks: Peanut Butter and Jelly Scones

Peanut Butter and Jelly Scones

Peanut butter and jelly really is a timeless combination — just like macaroni and cheese. Olive oil and vinegar. Pizza and beer. The X-Files and Sunday nights. You get the idea. Also, be warned, these peanut butter scones are very habit-forming and a little well of jelly in the middle makes them even better.

A nice thing about these scones is that they also include whole wheat flour and wheat germ. They aren’t overly sweet (for instance, you’re not going to get confused and think you’re eating an oatmeal cookie), but they don’t taste completely healthy either. They’re a little decadent but not too much.

The recipe below is for a full batch of scones but it can easily be halved to make 4-6 scones. I tend to think the delicious factor on baked goods is about two – three days, so I tend to make a lot of half recipes. If you think you can eat 8-12 scones in that amount of time, definitely go for it. When you pat your dough in into a circle, just use a pizza cutter to for 4 larger or 6 smaller scones. Repeat if that’s what you’re . . . → Read More: For Breakfast and for Snacks: Peanut Butter and Jelly Scones

FFwD: Ispahan Loaf Cake

French Fridays with Dorie: Ispahan Loaf Cake

French Friday’s with Dorie this week was Ispahan Loaf Cake, which is Persian, very time consuming (what with the egg separating, whites beating, raspberry placementing, etc,…) but quite delightful when it was all done. Perhaps it wasn’t the best project for a Thursday night, but we were having tasty, slightly-warm slices of cake by 8pm, so that’s not too bad.

I really didn’t change too much here: I added a pinch of salt and used almond extract for the rosewater extract. However, I was able to find rose syrup at a Middle Eastern market not too far from my house (the one next to Ya Hala), so that worked out. I found that mine took about 1 hour and ten minutes to produce a clean test knife.

An addition: I did take my extra raspberries, some chambord, a little sugar and made a quick raspberry sauce to accompany the cake. As usual, the recipe is in Dorie Greenspan’s cookbook, Around My French Table.

Here’s a link to everyone’s French Friday posts this week and my photos below.

French Fridays with Dorie: Ispahan Loaf Cake

French Fridays <span style= . . . → Read More: FFwD: Ispahan Loaf Cake

24 Hours on the Coast in Lincoln City, Oregon

Lincoln City, Oregon

Lincoln City is a long, sprawling town on the central Oregon coast. It has a casino, an outlet mall and continues along Highway 101 for miles. But it also has equal miles of sandy beaches, distinct neighborhoods and a couple of pretty good places to eat. It’s also known for all of the glass art studios that populate the area, as well as being a great location to view pelicans flying over the ocean. The Lincoln City Visitor and Convention Bureau even hides glass floats on the beach for visitors to find in the off season (boo! we did not find one).

Even though I wouldn’t necessarily call Lincoln City quaint, there’s a lot to see and do and it’s not very hard to get off the beaten path and do your own thing — but still easily treat yourself to a new pair of shoes at the Nike outlet.

Whispering Winds Motel
3264 NW Jetty Ave
Lincoln City, Oregon 97367

The first part to this quick, overnight trip was finding a place to stay. On earlier Lincoln City trips, we’ve stayed at both The Coho and Surftides, but I wanted to try some place new, which is . . . → Read More: 24 Hours on the Coast in Lincoln City, Oregon

FFwD: Orange Scented Lentil Soup

French Fridays with Dorie: Orange Scented Lentil Soup

Hello French Fridays with Dorie and this week’s Orange Scented Lentil Soup recipe. How are you? Well, I thought you were delicious!

I tend to have the opinion that, although lentil soups are in standard rotation at our house, they can be kind of boring. But not this bowl — the orange and spices are definitely different flavors than I normally go with and I think that really made this recipe a huge stand out.

Of course, I did a few things differently. I had about a cup of lamb braising sauce (sorry, Morrissey!*) leftover from the lamb shank adventure last weekend and I substituted that for about one cup of the broth (the miracle of lamb fat).

Other changes: I let my vegetables get a little brown in the beginning for more flavor. I also added some chopped kale at the end and I used red lentils instead of French green lentils. Because of that, I was able to shorten my simmering time by about 15 minutes. For garnishes I used the suggested crumbled bacon (oops!) and Greek yogurt. So good.

Here’s a link to everyone’s Orange Scented Lentil Soup this . . . → Read More: FFwD: Orange Scented Lentil Soup

Corned Beef and Cabbage Risotto for St. Patrick’s Day

Corned Beef and Cabbage Risotto for St. Patrick's Day

As promised, here’s another St. Patrick’s Day recipe (although it’s about a day later than I was hoping to post it). Luckily, there’s still plenty of time to plan on making a risotto like this for Friday’s (or Saturday’s, Sunday’s) dinner. If you are really smart, you will get a little extra corned beef and make yourself a sandwich at a later date — I was not smart. Learn from my mistake.

This is the second time I’ve used cabbage in risotto and I think it works very well — especially if you let it get a little color before you start adding broth.

On the side, we had a large arugula salad and, although we didn’t have any, some crusty bread or even Irish Soda Bread would be great too. Erin Go Bragh.

Corned Beef and Cabbage Risotto for St. Patrick's Day

Corned Beef and Cabbage Risotto for St. Patrick's Day

Corned Beef and Cabbage Risotto for St. Patrick's Day

Corned Beef and Cabbage Risotto for St. Patrick's Day

Corned Beef and Cabbage Risotto
Serves 3-4
4 cups vegetable broth
2 . . . → Read More: Corned Beef and Cabbage Risotto for St. Patrick’s Day